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Saturday, 18 October 2014

The Tie Project [Pt 5] — Big Test of a Little Bag

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Introducing the MyTie Makeover Mini Bag!
If you've followed my previous post about the tie project, you may recall that I'm finally going to take scissors to an actual tie. Well, I've done more than that, 'cause here is the full result: the MyTie Makeover Mini Bag! (I've never actually had a mai tai cocktail, but it sounds like it would be good and I love the meaning behind the words: out of this world.)

I feel somewhat proud of this one, having taken it from the "I see it, I like it and have to make it" phase to designing a finished product that looks similar to the originals but is still my own. As mentioned last time, I also have two other body styles that I am going to be including in a full PDF pattern/tutorial for sale.

For this particular test bag, I followed the instructions that I had previously posted for the muslin versions, so don't expect much additional verbiage regarding the steps here. To help you out, I've prepared a post with many, many photos! (If you missed the previous entries in this series, go to this page and you'll get the 411 on all of the posts that you'll need to reference for the "how to's" of the pattern and design.)


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The first step, obviously, is to pick open the tie. Reserve all pieces. (The little tab piece that holds the small end of the tie underneath? It's called the keeper. I will use it to create strap tabs, since I decided to put a chain strap on this.) All ties will have some sort of interlining keep that also. Once you have freed the basic fabric of the tie, give it a good press with an iron (careful not to scorch) and then measure and cut 5.5" off the wide end to use for the flap.

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Cut off five and a half inches from the end for the flap...

The lining from this particular tie is a lightweight felt; I pushed it back inside the flap and then hand-sewed the two sides back together.

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Whatever lining the tie had to begin with, keep it with the flap...

Of course, the next time I make this, I will simply cut off the end of the tie before picking it apart... duh!

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Putting back what I took out!

Next, I gathered up the pattern pieces that that I made for my muslin version and laid them out on top of the tie.

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Place your pattern pieces and then cut out...

Here is where I really wished I had a rotary cutter! Using scissors took a long time given the delicate nature of the fabric. (And I really dislike the cutting part of sewing at the best of times.)
MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Here are my main pieces...

To provide support for the gusset, I will sew in some of the tie's original felt lining; the width of it is almost perfect! (The gusset being 1.5" wide.)

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Cut a 1.5" wide piece from the remainder of the tie for the gusset...

I decided to apply fusible interfacing to the body pieces after all, despite my hesitation to commit the last time I posted about this. The thing that tilted the scales in the end was the fact that the fabric is so light and flimsy that if I don't interface it, it will 1) be very, very hard to sew and 2) not look very nice in the finished product (i.e., will hang like a sack when used as a purse).


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So (and this is where I hope pattern testers will be able to help me out), I used what I had on hand: scraps of Decor Bond. It results in a finish that's fairly stiff. You may appreciate that, once the purse is stuffed full of your personal crap. ;-)

Here are the two body panels all sewn up (and pressed).

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
That wasn't so hard...

The next step was to stack the two panels and ensure that they are the same size (i.e., clip off any excess if they don't match).

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Like my puzzle-like application of interfacing??

Next, I pinned the gusset (backed by the original felt lining) to one of the main panels.

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
The original felt lining is an ideal support for the underside of the gusset...

I attached the gusset with a 1/4" seam allowance.

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Gusset attached to one body panel...

Then pinned the other panel...

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
One side sewn, the other side pinned...

After sewing up the exterior shell, I did my best to finger press the seams, but there's only so much you can do with those. And here is what it looks like turned right side out...

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
The outer shell of this tie purse is basically done...


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Next, comes the lining! My tie came with a hanky, so I just used it to make a slip pocket. (Since this is just a test bag and I will be making more, I didn't go to the effort of adding a zippered pocket this time.)

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
The lining fabric is from a $2 set of pillowcases that I bought on vacation last month...

After attaching the pocket, I pinned the two lining body panels right sides together and stitched them together, starting with a 3/4" seam allowance at the top and tapering down to 1/4" the rest of the way.

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
Pinned and ready to sew... remember to leave a turning gap along the bottom!

This purse will have a chain, so I cut the keeper in half to create two little strap tabs and threaded them through a couple of D rings with attached swivel hooks. These, the purse flap, and the two front and back pleats are then basted in place.

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
An example of where basting is not really an option...

The exterior is then dropped into the lining of the bag, with right sides facing. (The pieces — surprisingly — ended up fitting together like a glove... no adjustments needed; that's a first!)

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs
It's a tight fit, but it's also the right fit!

After stitching together, the bag is turned through the gap left in the lining. The next step is to press and clip the top seam in preparation for topstitching.

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs

And here it is, all nicely topstitched!

MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs

All that's left is to close the opening in the bottom of the lining, make a buttonhole, sew on a button and add a chain... ta da! The MyTie Makeover Mini Bag!

The MyTie Makeover Mini Bag by eSheep Designs

Hope you found this series of posts informative and useful as a tutorial. As mentioned, I'm looking for pattern testers so if you have some ties at your disposal and want to take this on, please drop me a line or leave a comment. The pattern is ready and waiting!

TERMS OF USE

If you are "sew" inclined, feel free to make and sell as many MyTie Makeover Mini Bags as you care to; I only ask that you credit me and this blog by attaching the following card to the item.

eSheep Designs swing tag


9 comments:

  1. I hope you get some testers for this bag Rochelle after linking to my Weekend Link Party. I will be finishing my tie bag this weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for the support, Daryl. Looking forward to seeing your creation.

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  2. This Tie Bag is very clever. Creative Tie Bliss...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! (Although the idea is not mine originally...)

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  3. I've been hoarding thrift store ties waiting for the perfect project. I would love to use them to test out your patterns. Great design and tutorial!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Erin. Maybe send me an email (info@eSheepEnterprises.com) if you want to get involved in the pattern testing. (Once the current round is complete, I may need to go back and make sure that all three designs are represented.)

      Delete
    2. VERY CLEVER I AM THINKING OF TRYING IT . IS IT SMALL

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    3. Thank you for stopping by. If you check out the pattern listing on Craftsy, you can see photos of the bag being carried. It's small compared to a regular purse, but it actually can hold a lot.

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  4. Ok this answered my previous question about the single tie. FABULOUS bag! I have it pinned to try sometime myself!

    ReplyDelete

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